Review: Sara’s Song

Sara's SongSara’s Song by Fern Michaels

My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

Short synopsis:

Rock star falls for doctor. Rock star writes song for doctor. Rock star then is in plane crash and is claimed dead. Rock star’s brother enters picture. A love triangle and drama ensues as the rock star’s sleazy former girlfriend slash back-up singer tries to claim song as her own and does everything she can to get her evil mitts on it. Duh duh DUH….

I first read Sara’s Song as a young teen and found the story so romantic that its basic plot has stuck with me since. Being so young, I was able to look past, or more likely didn’t notice, the writing, specifically the stilted dialogue. It’s so clunky and awkward sounding, everybody talks as if they have the dread virus Verbal Diarrhea where they ramble from one topic to the next and back again using short, choppy sentences. Rather akin to riding a random thought roller coaster, I’d say. After a while the dialogue either became better or I became used to how it was written. There’s also some odd adjectives used a couple times (loose-limbed for one) and other words and phrases used too often. One phrase in particular that I’ve always hated: “It is what it is.” Shameful language ahead. No shit, Sherlock. This is surely one the stupidest expressions I’ve ever heard and want to punch anyone in the face who uses it (anger issues? Me?! Never!). Of course it is what it is, what the fuck else would it be?! Okay, calming down now. Anyway, seeing as the plot is rather implausible, I’m willing to forgive a lot, it is fantasy after all. Although, I find it very hard to believe a nurse can go from working at a hospital to working at a veterinarian’s office. Humans and animals may have similarities but they are different species. There’s no way I’d want her to touch my cat without first going back to school and studying to become a veterinary technician. I came across some typos and mistakes while reading the Kindle edition, such as incorrect word usage and random periods thrown into the middle of a sentence. I assume the latter came about through the transfer from paper to digital, but not too sure about the others.

With all that said, I still managed to become charmed by the story, flaws and all (and there are many), and had a hard time putting down the book. That tells a lot, seeing I have the attention span of a fruit fly. Even though this is technically a romance, not a lot of time is spent on developing much of a romance between Sara and Dallas or Sara and Adam, but there’s enough that I didn’t have a problem. However, what I did have an issue with was timing; I never knew how much time had passed in the book to gauge exactly where Sara and Dallas were in their relationship or how long the duration was between Dallas’ “death” and Sara and Adam’s attraction, mostly everything appeared to happen far too soon, but it’s hard to tell for certain. I liked the characters, they’re not anything spectacular or deep for that matter, but basically regular people who talk in an inhuman way. Dallas made some odd decisions that might rile or confound some people but I think that’s because (minor SPOILER, but nothing integral to the book’s plot) he obviously suffered a traumatic brain injury when he fell out of the tree at age eight. While the book makes no claim of the kind and just waives it off as dyslexia, poor eyesight, and being half-deaf. None of those would explain some of his choices like a brain injury would. END SPOILER But that’s just my hypotheses.

While this technically doesn’t deserve more than three stars and most aspects could have been stronger and employed more depth, I enjoyed reading the book and was able to get lost in the story of love, loss and happily ever after.

Originally Reviewed: November 9, 2012
Received: Digital copy borrowed from library
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